What To Do for Easter Brunch

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How to make Easter different this year

Egging you on for a sweet time

The race for the last of the eggs continues… outside of the grocery store, come April 9th. If you're hosting Easter brunch this year, are you ready to add an extra element of fun to the mix? Whether your guest list includes kids or adults only, give these games a shot to brighten things up (if your Easter palette wasn’t bright already). While we're not sure what the price of eggs will be as Easter nears... we don't think the egg supply and demand will impact the cost of plastic eggs. Putting our economics education to good use. Here’s how to mix up the Easter brunch fun this year.

what to do for easter this year

1. Easter egg hunt

Why change one of the best kid (and adult) traditions out there? The concept of an Easter egg hunt really is an entertaining one all around. For the hosts who get the pleasure of hiding the Easter eggs, of course the kids (again, or adults) who get to scramble around in search of eggs with prizes, and for the audience who gets to stand back to enjoy the excitement of the hunt... it really is an entertaining experience for all involved. Depending on the age of your players, fill the eggs with candy or various items for a twist.

Note: You may not have thought of adding an Easter egg hunt to your brunch if you're hosting a group of adults, but let us be clear that no Easter egg hunt has ever disappointed, from ages 1-101. Give adults the chance to run around a backyard, climb trees, peer into bushes, and sus out potted plants, and they will remember this Easter brunch.

Here are some ideas of what to fill your Easter eggs with:

  • Candy (obviously)
  • Dollar bills (know your audience, but this one's a real crowd-pleaser)
  • Clean candy: Lessen that sugar intake while still giving kids the thrill of the chase
  • Kids collection items: Keychains, loom bands, Frozen character pieces, stickers
  • Legos: Assign each kiddo a color, and divide a 25-piece mini set into plastic eggs. Each kid gets to hunt out their specified color. Once they've found all their eggs, they can get to work constructing their lego creations.
  • Crayons: Check the weather to be sure, because melted crayons wouldn't make anyone's Easter great. But upon hunting, the kids can begin workshopping their own Crayola masterpieces.
easter ideas for kids

Pro Tip: For kids of certain age groups (especially the ones we know will have a wide range of competition), we love assigning each hunter a color. This way, no matter how eagle eye or snail-like the kids may be, they each have a shot to find eggs in their color. You can always keep the competitive element there by making it a race. First one to find all their green eggs gets an extra chocolate bunny...

Which leads to an important note: Having a prize prepared for the winner. Kids love a prize. It doesn't even need to be significant, but the concept of participating with the incentive of winning something definitely gives kids that extra nudge.

For adults on their egg hunt... we'll let you decide if a prize is necessary. The fun here is more in having your friends and relatives take part in a traditionally child's game, and find it actually is quite fun.

2. Dyeing eggs

Another classic Easter tradition, for good reason. What cuter way to eat eggs for breakfast... than when you crack them from colorful, freshly dyed eggs.

What you need:

  • Eggs
  • Bowls of water
  • Colorful dye
  • Bonus: White crayon

Pro Tip: Use "invisible" ink

Kids love this one—as any element of "invisible" is exciting and mysterious to them. Bonus for you: It's as simple as adding a white crayon to your supplies list. 

With a white crayon, doodle designs, swirls, polka dots, chevron, or stripes on the egg shell prior to dyeing. Once you dip the eggs in dye, the white crayon will show through to reveal your "invisible" design.

2. Dyeing eggs

Another classic Easter tradition, for good reason. What cuter way to eat eggs for breakfast... than when you crack them from colorful, freshly dyed eggs.

What you need:

  • Eggs
  • Bowls of water
  • Colorful dye
  • Bonus: White crayon

Pro Tip: Use "invisible" ink

Kids love this one—as any element of "invisible" is exciting and mysterious to them. Bonus for you: It's as simple as adding a white crayon to your supplies list. 

With a white crayon, doodle designs, swirls, polka dots, chevron, or stripes on the egg shell prior to dyeing. Once you dip the eggs in dye, the white crayon will show through to reveal your "invisible" design.

3. Painting eggs

A slight twist on the dyeing activity above, with a potentially simpler set-up. If you don't have dye handy and didn't manage to snag it or order it in time, with all your other holiday to-do lists, opt for paint for an activity just as fun.

What you need:

  • Eggs
  • Paintbrush
  • Paint
  • Bowls of water
  • Egg carton

Painting eggs is as simple as:

With the eggs set securely in the carton, paint the portion of the egg that is in sight. Once the paint dries, carefully flip the egg's position to show the remaining white portion. Paint the white portion. Add any designs on top of the first layer of paint for a fun twist.

Pro Tip: Boil your eggs ahead of time ;) 

3. Painting eggs

A slight twist on the dyeing activity above, with a potentially simpler set-up. If you don't have dye handy and didn't manage to snag it or order it in time, with all your other holiday to-do lists, opt for paint for an activity just as fun.

What you need:

  • Eggs
  • Paintbrush
  • Paint
  • Bowls of water
  • Egg carton

Painting eggs is as simple as:

With the eggs set securely in the carton, paint the portion of the egg that is in sight. Once the paint dries, carefully flip the egg's position to show the remaining white portion. Paint the white portion. Add any designs on top of the first layer of paint for a fun twist.

Pro Tip: Boil your eggs ahead of time ;) 

4. Egg games

These may seem so common and traditional, but when is the last time you saw (or participated in) an egg toss? There's nothing quite like lining a group up—kids or adults here—and building the anticipation of shattering eggs. May the best egg win...

Egg relay

Two teams race to carry an egg on a spoon to a destination point and back, one player at a time. Challenge: Players hold the spoon in their mouth. We'd recommend having separate spoons for each player here ;) 

Egg toss

Players pair up into partners. Players stand in 2 lines, partners facing one another. Partners toss the egg back and forth. Each time the egg is successfully caught, one partner takes a step back to widen the distance between partners. Last partnership with egg intact wins!

5. Goodie bag ideas

While the little ones may be entirely satisfied with their Easter egg hunt findings, if you're in the camp of wanting to make sure everyone has something even to take home, these goodie bag take-home ideas are for you.

what to give kids for easter
  • Candy: Easter candy is a must-have for any Easter goodie bag. Yes, we know they may have already found their fair share with the egg hunt, but this is the time of year they can truly indulge (oh wait, that's Halloween... we'll let you decide). Top Easter candies include chocolate bunnies, jelly beans, Peeps marshmallow chicks, and Cadbury chocolate eggs. 
  • Coloring books and crayons: With the freshness of spring all around (or trying anyway), it's a great time to gift crisp new coloring books. Kids love coloring books and crayons, and they're a surefire way to keep kids occupied when the iPad time is stacking up.
  • Mini stuffed animals: Pick out a few springtime animals (which can be really any animal—but we imagine animals frolicking in a meadow, like baby deer, ducklings, or lambs). Or keep it traditionally Easter-themed with a stuffed baby chick or bunny. 
  • Sidewalk chalk: We love sidewalk chalk because it encourages creativity, spending time outside, and stimulates their minds. Sidewalk chalk is a great addition to goodie bags and can keep kids entertained for hours.
  • Play-Doh: Kids love Play-doh, and you can include small containers of different colors in the goodie bags. Look for the pastel colors especially if you're wanting to stay on the Easter springtime theme.
  • Bubble Wands: These are classic kids items... for good reason.

May your Easter brunch bring all the sweet colors and flavors of spring, alongside the competition that only an egg hunt can bring out.

Psst... still planning your Easter gathering? Check out these parties by Partytrick to jumpstart your hosting!

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